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1.24.18| Daily Art

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Skin Above My Brows

Every few months, I’ll get the itch to lop off some hair. Sometimes it’ll starts to feel a little long. Or heavy. Or unhealthy, splits-endy, riddled with brassy blonde forks. Or, as in the case of 2016, my hair dryer will simply break in the middle of February, coldest time of year, and I’ll be too lazy to buy a new one, so I’ll cut off my hair instead.

This time, though, it just spun too many times when I bunn’ed it over my head. The ends felt speckled and dry and fried, probably from all the hydrogen peroxide I doused it in over the summer. It just felt weird. Too long. Too light. Too dry. So I cut off four inches–a pretty moderate snip, if you know me.

Last time, I went overboard, chopped off a layer so short it hung parallel to my ear.

It feels short and clean and healthy right now. The ends are dark, the way they should be, and not forked or fried at the ends. I thinned out my hair as well but it feels the right amount of thick, enough to keep my scalp warm (I hope), but not so thick I feel like a tree.

Since I was already on the grooming train, I figured I’d do my eyebrows as well. So I threaded those bad boys. My skin above my brow’s burning a little now.

1.23.18| Daily Art

A Year of Digital Painting

leilani-2

Spent last Nov/December holed up into digital art, the one thing I derived a sense of stability from. With protests going on outside my room–constantly, it seemed–and wishy-washy people fluttering around and tests looming ahead, art was an escape.

So I drew. A lot. Mostly on the computer using Wacom tablets–the library had them. They had the Cintiq, a massive screen you can draw on, and smaller Wacom bamboo tablets. I’d spend hours a day drawing on Photoshop, learning from artists on Youtube, hunting out inspiration on DeviantArt.

jan-16

 

 

Blink. These are screenshots from an animation I worked on in February. I didn’t realize, until attempting animation, how much of it I took for granted–how tedious the process really was, how every 1/20 or 1/80 of a second had to be drawn by-hand. And only then could you piece together the slightest movement. (Though there are animation programs now, which speeds up the process)

lightface

Ruby. I used this piece to practice digital shading. Creating depth/values on Photoshop is a quicker process than it is with oils and acrylics. With paint, you have to mix and dilute until you have the right shade and consistency; on Photoshop, it offers the entire color spectrum with all its variations. I was initially was frustrated with this piece until I threw in highlights–on the nose, lips and cheek–which added a lot more depth to the piece, and subsequent realism.

When it comes to shading, I’ll usually start out with a base color, add in shadows, then tentative highlights. I’ll go on to darken the shadows, do a bit of blending, and then add a final layer of the brightest (sometimes completely white) highlights. These are the little white dabs on her upper lip and nose bridge.

eyes

This was my first digital sketch, done hurriedly over a one hour lunch break.

version 3

A few days later, I decided to expand on the eye, to practice faces and portraits (my favorite! as you can probably tell), so I sketched her, who I never named–my first digital portrait.